Appearances are Deceiving

I ran across an interesting post this morning from World of Weird: people who are more verbal at work are perceived as better leaders than those who are not, regardless of actual productivity.

I am fortunate to work for a good company and about half of the managers are very productive sorts.  But I have noticed one particular colleague who doesn’t produce much but is highly regarded by the man at the helm.  Too, I have noticed that this man seems to hold an exalted view of himself as he is slightly but consistently condescending toward not only myself but all of his other colleagues.

Another is a constant talker, but an inconsistent doer.  He often complains about a heavy workload though I see very little product from his group.  I have been involved in meetings with him where he provides an exceptionally wordy answer to quite a simple question.

I actually like both of these men.  They each have some positive characteristics, and are personally charming.  But I can’t ignore that this is an element of unfairness to this.

The world is, however, not fair.  That is the reality of things.  And I can choose to behave however I like, accepting the kudos and the consequences accordingly.   I have options; I can be whom I choose.

For me, the essential consideration is my intent, and the goals that I have for my life.  My intent at work is to be productive and be the buffer between executive management and my teams.  My personal goals involve gaining independence and exploring my potential.  For me, neither of these objectives are consistent with the sorts of behaviors I have described above.

And those behaviors, in the past they bothered me.  I was troubled by the unfairness of the situation.  I was plagued by the thought of being considered less capable.  I’ve learned to moderate this by speaking up judiciously, and highlighting my teams’ achievements.  This works for me, and it fits with my values.

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